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Recent Quickfacts   members only

Census Tract Changes
Tract Changes The 2010 Census took two pairs of Camden downtown census tracts and merged them, as the City's total went from 21 to 19 tracts. Population decreased slightly overall from 2000 to 2010, though a majority of the neighborhoods either had double-digit percent gains or losses in that span. Demographics
 


Camden Poverty Trends
When examining the new 2010 Census figures, Camden’s poverty rates are steady, but the numbers remain alarming. The poverty line, as defined by the Census, is a specific before-tax yearly income amount which varies according to age and household members.
 
An examination of Camden's Property Tax Flow
The total size of Camden's operating budget has grown 26% after inflation, from $134 million in 2001 to $169 million in 2010, an average of 2.62% per year. While an increase of $35 million is large in absolute and per capita terms, and year-to-year swings of expansion and cuts have been very erratic, Camden's spending growth is actually somewhat slower than the 2.84% average annual growth rate in 2008 and '09 for all NJ Municipalities.
 
Where do Camden Residents Work?
24,853 Camden residents were employed in 2008 from a workforce of 27,088. While there were 34,872 jobs in the city that same year, 79% of Camden residents held their primary job outside the city. This report details trends in resident employment locations.
 
An examination of Camden's Municipal Expenditures
The total size of Camden's operating budget has grown 26% after inflation, from $134 million in 2001 to $169 million in 2010, an average of 2.62% per year. While an increase of $35 million is large in absolute and per capita terms, and year-to-year swings of expansion and cuts have been very erratic, Camden's spending growth is actually somewhat slower than the 2.84% average annual growth rate in 2008 and '09 for all NJ Municipalities. This report analyzes trends in Camden's municipal expenditures since 2001.
 
Where do Camden's Municipal Revenues Come From?
Why is Camden in such persistent need of revenue? Costs are not just rising; revenue is falling. Poverty in the City, in the context of weakness in the broader economy, has meant that local revenues continue to decline as the State copes with its own budget shortfalls. The history of these revenues (local, special state aid, and formula state aid) falls into 3 phases.
 
How Well is Camden Served by Open Space?
Public space is the infrastructure of community building. In the age of automobiles, when individuals are less likely than ever to walk, even for short distances, parks less than ¼ mile away give the best chance that residents will actually receive the health and community-building benefits of accessible open space. This quickfact examines what percentage of Camden's population falls into easy walking distance from parks.
 
Is Camden Well Served by Banks?
Access to a bank account can provide households with an important first step towards financial security, allowing families to conduct basic financial transactions, save for emergency and long-term security needs, and access credit on affordable terms. The findings from a recent FDIC study suggest that Camden residents are disproportionately underserved by banks.
 
PATCO Daily Ridership
PATCO's Speedline, with one end rooted in the Camden county suburbs and the other in the heart of Philadelphia's center city, runs through the City of Camden with 3 of the line's 13 stations (City Hall, Broadway, and Ferry Avenue). With 23% of the stations, Camden nonetheless generates 30% of PATCO's riders.
 
2009 Camden School Performance
The 2009 NJ School Report Card showed a significant drop in the number of Camden students scoring proficient on the High School Proficiency Assessment, particularly in math, where declines occurred across the board. This report details trends in HSPA scores, absentee rates, enrollment numbers, and school resources.
 
Access to High-Speed Internet in Camden
On March 16th, 2010 the Federal Communications Commission announced its National Broadband Plan to bring high-speed internet connections to every home and business in America. All together, approximately 29% of Camden households have access to high-speed internet at home.

Is Camden Really the Most "Dangerous" City?
Crime in Camden is a significant problem that deserves serious attention, but the City's perennial high ranking in a national list of "most dangerous cities" requires additional context to turn an alarming number into a productive discussion. This report details the limitations in ranking cities for dangerousness.

Recent CamConnect Reports

2012 Camden Higher Education and Healthcare Task Force Report
This report details the impact of the Camden Higher Education and Healthcare Task Force institutions - CAMcare, Camden County College, Cooper University Hopital, Lourdes Health System, Rowan University, Rutgers-Camden, The University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, and Virtua - on the City.


GCP's
2011 Downtown Camden & Beyond
CamConnect recently partnered with Greater Camden Partnership and Spark Creative to create the 2011 Annual Report on Downtown Camden. This report is the second in a series of benchmark reports on revitalization efforts in downtown Camden.
 
CCOP's 2009 Survey on Camden's Recovery
CamConnect created the survey and analyzed the data for Camden Churches Organized for People's 2009 report. The report details resident and non-resident perceptions of change in areas ranging from economic development to public safety and education
  

Recent External Reports
 
Mayor Redd's Transition Team:
Housing and Homelessness
Report's Suggestions:
  • Host an "open for business" meeting with developers, both for- and non-profit
  • Organize a "summit" for homeless providers
  • Create task force to investigate ways to streamline government
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    Mayor Redd's Transition Team: Economic Development & Entrepeneurship
    Report's Suggestions:
  • Create a Mayor's economic development team
  • Create a Mayor's business advisory council

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    Mayor Redd's Transition Team: Transition Report on Family Wellness
    Report's Suggestions:
  • Issue Mayoral Pledge and Wellness Campaign
  • Establish Health Advisory Council

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    Mayor Redd's Transition Team: Clean Green and Infrastucture
    Report's Suggestions:
  • Examine implementation of Abandoned Properties Act
  • Announce city-wide cleanup
  • Implement "eye in the sky" program

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    Mayor Redd's Transition Team: Youth Development
    Report's Suggestions:
  • Assess the Youth Development Council
  • Conduct an inventory of youth development agencies
  • Organize a forum of youth development leaders

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